Django Posts

40 posts tagged with django

This SO post prompted me to think about how you would go about customizing a entire Django site (not just an app). Particularly if it is a third party project, still in development.

Forking the site repository is a solution, but the more customizations you make, the more awkward it becomes to merge upstream fixes and features. The problem is compounded if you have multiple deploys, with custom templates, assets, and settings.

I wanted to do a quick write-up of how this would be done in Moya, where customization is more of a first-class concept.

I'll briefly go over how you would serve a Moya site with a custom template, without modifying any of the original files. The project I'll be customizing is Moya Techblog which power this blog. continue reading…

The Django code in this post comes from the official Django tutorial.

I've tried not to be disingenuous with the comparison, and I'm only going to compare like with like, so I can show code from both frameworks and let you draw your own conclusions. I'll cover the areas where they differ in another post.

Both Moya and Django use models to map databases on to familiar data structures. In the case of Moya, the mapping is done with SQLAlchemy. Django uses its own ORM.

Here's the from the Django tutorial and a Moya version: continue reading…

Have you ever needed to test multiple user accounts in your web app?

If you need to check your permissions are working correctly, you might find you are constantly switching users by logging in and logging out. Or you could have an admin user signed in to Chrome, and another user signed in to Firefox. Either way, its a bit of a pain.

Here's a simpler solution; define multiple aliases to in your /etc/hosts file. That way you can have one tab open at http://adminuser:8000/ and another open at http://user1:8000/ with two entirely different user accounts.

This assumes of course that you have a development server running locally, and that your app is configured to serve to these 'domains'.

For example (append this to /etc/hosts):

Moya's template language is a spiritual successor to Django, and Jinja templates. It borrows a number of constructs from both, and adds a few of its own.

There is a slight difference in the syntax in that variables are substituted with ${variable} rather than {{ variable }}, but tags still use the familiar {% tag %} syntax.

Template languages are generally quite extensible, so there is probably nothing that Moya templates can do that Django / Jinja can't (via a plugin or extension), but there are a few things which are I think are more elegant in Moya's templates language (and built-in). I'm going to talk about a few of them in this post.

How often have you written code like this? continue reading…

I've had a blog on my vanity domain for nearly a decade now. For the last 6 years, it has been powered by Django Techblog, which I wrote out of my frustration with syntax highlighting plugins in Wordpress. Techblog has happily served my blog those 6 years, with only minor hiccups when I half-heartedly ported the code to the latest Django.

There was nothing terribly wrong with Django Techblog; it had multiple blogs, tags, search etc., but there were some annoyances that I didn't have the motivation to do much about. The custom markup system I used was clever, but I would often forget the syntax! The support for images was rudimentary and the single-threaded comment system wouldn't notify me of replies. continue reading…

My client, WildFoundry, is looking for an experienced Python developer to join us. We work in the field of IoT, and you will get to work with a variety of really cool technologies. Here's the job description:

WildFoundry is seeking a senior Python web application developer on a 8 month contract to help us in the development of the dataplicity Internet-of-Things platform ( You would be expected to work from your home or own office most of the time and very high quality candidates based in Slovakia, Poland and the United Kingdom will be considered.

This is an unbeatable opportunity to work from home, earn excellent rates and join in with fast growing projects. continue reading…

I have a webserver with 3 WSGI applications running on different domains (1, 2, 3). All deployed with a combination of Gunicorn and NGINX. A combination that works really well, but there are two annoyances that are only going to get worse the more sites I deploy:

A) The configuration for each server resides in a different location on the filesystem, so I have to recall & type a long path to edit settings. continue reading…

I never intended to write a template system for Moya. Originally, I was going to offer a plugin system to use any template format you wish, with Jinja as the default. Jinja was certainly up to the task; it is blindingly fast, with a comfortable Django-like syntax. But it was never going to work exactly how I wanted it to, and since I don't have to be pragmatic on my hobby projects, I decided to re-invent the wheel. Because otherwise, how do we get better wheels? continue reading…

My client is looking to hire a new Python developer, initially for an 8 month contract. It's a home working position, we communicate mostly via Skype / email / gtalk etc. Although we do meet up in meatspace from time to time, so ideally a candidate would be in the London / Oxford area.

You will be working with your truly. The projects I've been working on are in the server side of web-enabled devices. The web interface is written in Django, so you'll need the usual battery of front-end technologies; HTML, CSS, Javascript etc. We have a Twistd server which communicates with devices in the field, that my client produces. In the middle we have dynamic user interface generation from XML. continue reading…

Here's a Python gotcha that I spent some time tracking down. I'm writing it up in the spirit of saving developers a debugging headache in the future.

I had an integer with a single bit set, and I wanted to find the index of that bit. For example, 4 in binary is 00000100. The 1 is at the third position from the right, which should give an index of 2 – since the first position is 0.

You can do this in two ways; either check each bit in turn until you find a 1, or you can use math as a shortcut. I chose the math solution:

Simple right? Finally staying awake in high school maths paid off. So simple that it was the last bit of code I suspected to be broken (spoiler: it was). continue reading…