Fs Posts

7 posts tagged with fs

I've just released version 2.0.3 of PyFilesystem.

PyFilesystem is an abstraction layer for filesystems (or anything that resembles a filesystem). See this post for more details.

New in this version is a TarFS filesystem contributed by Martin Larralde, which compliments ZipFS nicely.

Contributed by gpcimino, the copy module was extended new functionality to selectively copy only new files from one filesystem to another. Very useful for backups.

This is in addition to bugfixes, and improved documentation.

I'd like to announce version 2.0.0 of PyFilesystem, which is now available on PyPi.

PyFilesystem is a Python module I started some time in 2008, and since then it has been very much a part of my personal standard library. I've used it in personal and professional projects, as have many other developers and organisations.

If you aren't familiar with PyFilesystem; it's an abstraction layer for filesystems. Essentially anything with files and directories (hard-drive, zip file, ftp server, network filesystems etc.) may be wrapped with a common interface. With it, you can write code that is agnostic as to where the files are physically located.

Here's a quick example that recursively counts the lines of code in a directory: continue reading…

Ben Timby has committed code to PyFilesystem that lets you expose any filesystem over FTP. We've had the ability to serve filesystems over SFTP (secure ftp) and XMLRPC for a while, but plain old FTP was a glaring omission–until now.

You can serve the current directory programatically with something like the following:

The same functionality is also available to the fsserve command. The following is equivalent to the above code, but from the command line:

You'll probably need root privileges (i.e. sudo) on Linux for these examples.

With the server running, you can browse the files on your home directory with an ftp client, or by typing “ftp://127.0.0.1” in to your browser. Any of the other supported filesystems can be served in the same way. continue reading…

There have been some pretty exciting developments in PyFilesystem since version 0.3 was released – Ryan Kelly and myself have been hard at work, and there have been a number of excellent contributions to the code base from other developers. Version 0.4 will be released some time in January, but I'd like to give you a preview of some new features before the next version lands.

Pyfilesystem is a Python module that provides a simplified common interface to many types of filesystem.

It is now possible to open any of the supported filesystems from a URL in this format, which makes it very easy to specify a filesystem (or individual file) from the command line or a config file. Here's a quick example that opens a bunch of quite different filesystems: continue reading…

I am pleased to announce a new version of PyFilesystem (0.3), which is a Python module that provides a common interface to many kinds of filesystem. Basically it provides a way of working with files and directories that is exactly the same, regardless of how and where the file information is stored. Even if you don't plan on working with anything other than the files and directories on your hard-drive, PyFilesystem can simplify your code and reduce the potential of error.

PyFilesystem is a joint effort by myself and Ryan Kelly, who has created a number of new FS implementations such as Amazon S3 support and Secure FTP, and some pretty cool features such as FUSE support and Django storage integration. continue reading…

After my last post regarding FS, my file-system abstraction layer for Python, I think I may have left people thinking,"that's nice, but what would you use if for?". Generally, I see it as a way of simplifying file access and exposing only the files you need for your application -- regardless of their physical source. But I can think of a few other uses that may be a littler cooler. continue reading…

This is something I have been hacking together for a while now; FS is a file-system abstraction for Python. It has reached a stable state and is worthy of an official (0.1.0) release. continue reading…